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Tensions escalate in Pakistan and Iran, clash over Balochistan

Iran-pak border
Pakistan has called on Iran to take appropriate action to stop extremist attacks on the Pakistani army.
Pakistan alleges that separatist Baloch Liberation Ormi uses Iranian land to carry out extremist attacks.
In this connection, Pakistan's army chief General Qamar Bajwa spoke to Iranian Army Chief Maj. Gen. Mohammad Bakri and said that Pakistan also wants to have mutual respect and equality in its relationship with its neighbouring countries.
This is the second case in recent times when relations between the two countries have been soured over an issue. Earlier in the day, Pakistan had alleged that despite its objection, Iran had sent 5,000 people back to Pakistan during the Corona era.
Pakistan's Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qurashi had blamed Iran for spreading corona virus infection in Pakistan.
On Friday, a patrol of the Fronter Corps was attacked in Balochistan, killing six soldiers. The attack was claimed by the Baloch Liberation Army.
A statement issued by the Pakistani army said the two army chiefs agreed to tighten security measures along the border.
Unlike Pakistan, Iran alleges that Iranian extremists use Pakistan's soil. The allegations between the two countries have been going on for a long time.
Pakistan has also started fencing along the 909-km border with Iran. The Government of Pakistan has also allocated an amount of 300 000 rupees for the same.

Pak-iran tensions

Charge counter

When Iran's Revolutionary Guards were attacked in February last year, Iran warned Pakistan of strong warning. At least 27 revolutionary guards personnel were killed in the attack.
Iran alleged that the attack was carried out by extremists for sheltering in Pakistan. But when Pakistani troops were attacked in Baloch in April last year, Pakistan blamed baloch separatists in Iran for the same.
At least 14 Pakistani soldiers were killed in the attack. Thereafter, Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan visited Iran. Ahead of Imran Khan's visit, Pakistan's Foreign Ministry had said in a strong letter to the Iranian embassy that the attackers had come from Iran.
Imran Khan also raised the issue in his visit to Iran. The two countries also agreed to stop extremist activities from across the border.
In fact, Pakistan's Balochistan province is bordering Iran. Baloch is also in Pakistan and also in Iran. Iran's Sistan and Balochistan province sit on the border of Pakistan, where Baloch lives.
There was a time when both Pakistan and Iran considered the growing influence of the Baloch nationalist as a threat. In the '70s, these leaders and the movement were also dealt with.
But amid a dispute over several issues with Pakistan, Iran began to take a softer approach to the Baloch nationalist.
Baloch organizations in Iran also continue to hand over two hands to Sunni Baloch organizations against Iran, and on many occasions they have helped Iran.

Pak-Iran Border Dispute

Relationship fluctuations

The relationship between Pakistan and Iran has always fluctuated. When Pakistan was formed in 1947, Iran was among the few countries that recognised Pakistan.
In 1948, pakistan's then Prime Minister Liaqat Ali Khan also visited Iran. Later, the Shah of Iran visited Pakistan in 1950. The relationship between the two countries seemed to go in a good direction.
But relations between Sunni-dominated Pakistan and Shiite-dominated Iran have not always been good. But Shia-Sunni tensions in Pakistan affected its relationship with Iran.
After the Islamic revolution of 1979, Iran began to take an aggressive stand on Pakistan. It also opposed Pakistan's policy of patronizing the Taliban in Afghanistan.
9/10 in USA Pakistan's policy after the attack of 11 is not to Iran. Pakistan's pro-Saudi policy also soured relations.
During the reign of General Zia ul Haq, Pakistan grew closer to Saudi Arabia and Iran did not have these eyes.
But the economic relationship between the two countries remained in tout. Iran also showed interest in the China-led economic corridor. For Pakistan too, oil and gas-rich Iran was a better choice for trade.
Maj. Gen. Qasim Suleimani

Mediation

In January this year, the Commander of the Iranian Army, Maj. Gen. Qasim Suleimani, was killed in a US military operation.
Us Secretary of State Mike Pompeo then called Pakistani army chief Bajwa. Pakistan tried to ease tensions between Iran and the United States.
Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan even told a gathering that Pakistan would not allow its land to be used for attacks against any country. Imran Khan had also talked about reconciliation between Saudi Arabia and Iran at that time.
However, some in Iran were shocked that Pakistan did not condemn Suleimani's assassination in the strongest terms.

Internal position

However, the fact remains that if the war broke out in Iran and the United States over Suleimani's death, it would not have been a good situation for Pakistan. Perhaps that's why Pakistan took the initiative for reconciliation, and somewhere the United States also took Pakistan.
But on most occasions, Pakistan wants to remain neutral in relations between Iran and the United States, which is also true. Perhaps this is because of pakistan's internal situation.
In Jammu and Kashmir, When India announced the removal of Article 370, Iran took a firm stand. When riots broke out in India's capital city this year, Iran's foreign minister tweeted that Iran opposes sponsored violence against Muslims in India.
Iran's stand on the Kashmir and Delhi riots was a happy one for Pakistan.
Amidst all this, Pakistan's relations with Iran have been sour. While both countries seem bound by religion, culture and literature, the extreme events in the border areas have been hampered by relationships.
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